Factors influencing the participation of gastroenterologists and hepatologists in clinical research.

Published online

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Although clinical research is integral to the advancement of medical knowledge, physicians face a variety of obstacles to their participation as investigators in clinical trials. We examined factors that influence the participation of gastroenterologists and hepatologists in clinical research. METHODS: We surveyed 1050 members of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases regarding their participation in clinical research. We compared the survey responses by specialty and level of clinical trial experience. RESULTS: A majority of the respondents (71.6%) reported involvement in research activities. Factors most influential in clinical trial participation included funding and compensation (88.3%) and intellectual pursuit (87.8%). Barriers to participation were similar between gastroenterologists (n = 160) and hepatologists (n = 189) and between highly experienced (n = 62) and less experienced (n = 159) clinical researchers. These barriers included uncompensated research costs and lack of specialized support. Industry marketing was a greater influence among respondents with less trial experience, compared to those with extensive experience (15.7% vs 1.6%; P < .01). Hepatologists and respondents with extensive clinical trial experience tended to be more interested in phase 1 and 2 studies, whereas gastroenterologists and less experienced investigators were more interested in phase 4 studies. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the greatest barrier to participation in clinical research is lack of adequate resources. Respondents also favored industry-sponsored research with less complex trial protocols and studies of relatively short duration.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Dev, AT; Kauf, TL; Zekry, A; Patel, K; Heller, K; Schulman, KA; McHutchison, JG

Published Date

  • October 8, 2008

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 8 /

Start / End Page

  • 208 -

PubMed ID

  • 18842135

Pubmed Central ID

  • 18842135

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1472-6963

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1186/1472-6963-8-208

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England