Predictors of positive head-up tilt test in patients with suspected neurocardiogenic syncope or presyncope.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

Neurocardiogenic syncope is the most common cause of syncope in patients who present in outpatient clinics. Head-up tilt test (HUT) has been widely used to diagnose neurocardiogenic syncope. However, the HUT does not always produce a positive response in patients with suspected neurocardiogenic syncope. The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical history and characteristics of patients with suspected neurocardiogenic syncope or presyncope who undertook HUT, and to identify prognostic factors of a positive HUT response. During the first phase of HUT, patients were tilted to a 70-degree angle for 30 minutes. If the first phase produced a negative response, the second phase was subsequently performed involving intravenous isoproterenol administration. Of 711 patients, 423 (59.5%) patients showed a positive HUT response. In contrast to previous studies, this study showed that the vasodepressive type (76.6%) was the most common pattern of positive response, and that the rate of positive response during the first phase was low (7.1%). By multivariate analysis, the occurrence of junctional rhythm was found to be a predictor of an impending positive response in HUT (P < 0.001). The shorter time interval between the last episode and HUT was also a predictor of positive response (P = 0.0015). Younger age (P = 0.0003) and a history of physical injury during a syncopal episode (P = 0.019) were found to be associated with a positive response in the first phase of HUT.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Oh, JH; Kim, JS; Kwon, HC; Hong, KP; Park, J-E; Seo, JD; Lee, WR

Published Date

  • February 2003

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 26 / 2 Pt 1

Start / End Page

  • 593 - 598

PubMed ID

  • 12710319

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0147-8389

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1046/j.1460-9592.2003.00099.x

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States