Early ambulation after 5 French diagnostic cardiac catheterization: results of a multicenter trial.

Published

Journal Article

Because earlier ambulation and discharge after cardiac catheterization may result in the increased utilization of outpatient facilities, a prospective five center clinical pilot trial assessing the safety and outcome of early ambulation after routine left heart catheterization was performed in 287 patients. Catheterization routines at each clinical center were unchanged throughout the study. After the diagnostic catheterization using 5 French (F), preformed, large lumen catheters and arterial puncture compression (mean 15 min, range 5 to 52), 260 patients were ambulated by a physician at a mean time of 2.6 h (range 1.8 to 3.1) after catheterization. Follow-up examination or a phone call 24 to 72 h later was performed to assess late results. The mean age of the patients was 58 years (range 25 to 91); 166 (58%) were men. Left ventricular ejection fraction was 54 +/- 15%. One hundred twenty-seven patients (44%) received intravenous heparin (1,500 to 5,000 U as an intravenous bolus) and 136 (47%) received aspirin. Major complications included transient ischemic attack (one patient) and ventricular tachycardia requiring cardioversion during ventriculography (two patients). A small hematoma (less than 5.0 cm) after ambulation occurred early (from compression to standing) in 14 patients (5%; 9 received heparin, 8 were taking aspirin) and later (after standing to 72 h) in 9 patients (3%; 2 receiving heparin, 2 taking aspirin). Five patients with a hematoma had studies with a 6F sheath. No patient required surgical intervention for early or late hematoma. Only three patients (1%) needed a 7F or 8F catheter because of suboptimal 5F coronary angiography.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Kern, MJ; Cohen, M; Talley, JD; Litvack, F; Serota, H; Aguirre, F; Deligonul, U; Bashore, TM

Published Date

  • June 1, 1990

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 15 / 7

Start / End Page

  • 1475 - 1483

PubMed ID

  • 2188985

Pubmed Central ID

  • 2188985

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0735-1097

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/0735-1097(90)92813-h

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States