Relation of quantitative coronary lesion measurements to the development of exercise-induced ischemia assessed by exercise echocardiography.

Journal Article

To assess the relation of quantitative measures of coronary stenoses to the development of exercise-induced regional wall motion abnormalities, 34 patients with isolated, single vessel coronary artery lesions and normal wall motion at rest underwent exercise echocardiography and quantitative angiography on the same day. Although all 11 patients with a visually estimated stenosis greater than or equal to 75% had an ischemic response and 10 (91%) of 11 patients with a less than or equal to 25% visually estimated stenosis had a normal response by exercise echocardiography, among 12 patients with a visually estimated stenosis of 50%, 6 (50%) had an ischemic response and 6 (50%) had a normal exercise echocardiogram. Quantitative measurements of stenosis severity distinguished patients with ischemic (group 1) from normal (group 2) exercise echocardiographic responses as follows: minimal luminal diameter (mm), group 1 1.0 +/- 0.4 versus group 2 1.7 +/- 0.4, p less than 0.0001; minimal cross-sectional area (mm2), group 1 0.9 +/- 0.6 versus group 2 2.5 +/- 1.1, p less than 0.0001; percent diameter stenosis, group 1 68.3 +/- 14.2 versus group 2 42.2 +/- 12.1, p less than 0.0001; and percent area stenosis, group 1 87.5 +/- 7.8 versus group 2 64.8 +/- 15.9, p less than 0.0001. These data validate the utility of exercise echocardiography by demonstrating that 1) coronary stenosis severity measured by quantitative angiography is closely related to wall motion abnormalities detected by exercise echocardiography, and 2) exercise echocardiography can be used as a noninvasive means to assess the physiologic significance of coronary artery lesions.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Sheikh, KH; Bengtson, JR; Helmy, S; Juarez, C; Burgess, R; Bashore, TM; Kisslo, J

Published Date

  • April 1990

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 15 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 1043 - 1051

PubMed ID

  • 2312958

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0735-1097

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States