Five-year effects of an anti-poverty program on marriage among never-married mothers

Published

Journal Article

Using data from an experimental evaluation of the New Hope project, an antipoverty program that increased employment and income, this study examined the effects of New Hope on entry into marriage among never-married mothers. Among never-married mothers, New Hope significantly increased rates of marriage. Five years after random assignment, 21 percent of women assigned to the New Hope condition were married, compared to 12 percent of those assigned to the control group. The New Hope impact on marriage was robust to variations in model specification. The program also increased income, wage growth, and goal efficacy among never-married mothers, and decreased depression. In non-experimental analyses, income and earnings were associated with higher probability of marriage and material hardship was associated with lower probability of marriage. © 2006 by the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Gassman-Pines, A; Yoshikawa, H

Published Date

  • December 1, 2006

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 25 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 11 - 30

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0276-8739

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/pam.20154

Citation Source

  • Scopus