Three successful pregnancies through dietary management of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency.

Published

Journal Article

Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) deficiency (OMIM 229700) has been characterized as the cause of life-threatening hypoglycaemia and lactic acidaemia following prolonged fasting. The patient, an adult African-American woman, presented during the second trimester of her first pregnancy with recurrent episodes of lactic acidaemia and hypoglycaemia. She had recently been admitted to a nearby intensive care unit after presentation with profound hypoglycaemia and lactic acidosis, and was found to be pregnant. The history was remarkable for approximately 30 hospitalizations for hypoglycaemia and acidosis. She had previously undergone liver biopsy at another centre and was diagnosed with a 'glycogen storage disease', although no enzyme testing had been done for confirmation. Based on clinical symptoms, a diagnosis of FBPase deficiency was accomplished through gene sequencing, which revealed homozygosity for a panethnic, common mutation, 960/961insG in exon 7. The availability of mutation testing facilitated the confirmation of FBPase deficiency in this patient, obviating liver biopsy for enzyme activity confirmation. The patient underwent three successful pregnancies by strict compliance with dietary management, including nocturnal uncooked cornstarch to manage hypoglycaemia. The pregnancies were complicated by mild gestational diabetes, increased cornstarch requirements, and hypoglycaemia at the time of discharge from the hospital. The three infants had normal birth weights and experienced no complications during the neonatal period. The patient subsequently developed sensorineural hearing loss and early-onset cognitive impairment, despite compliance with the monitoring and treatment of hypoglycaemia. The experience with multiple pregnancies in this FBPase-deficient patient provides insight into the management of hypoglycaemia in inherited disorders of gluconeogenesis.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Krishnamurthy, V; Eschrich, K; Boney, A; Sullivan, J; McDonald, M; Kishnani, PS; Koeberl, DD

Published Date

  • October 2007

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 30 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 819 -

PubMed ID

  • 17705024

Pubmed Central ID

  • 17705024

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1573-2665

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0141-8955

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/s10545-007-0606-y

Language

  • eng