Impact of glucose self-monitoring on non-insulin-treated patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Randomized controlled trial comparing blood and urine testing.

Published

Journal Article

The goal of this study was to compare the relative efficacy and cost of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) with routine urine testing in the management of patients with type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus not treated with insulin. Fifty-four patients with type II diabetes mellitus, not treated with insulin, who had inadequate glucose control on diet alone or diet and oral hypoglycemic agents were studied. Patients performed SMBG or urine glucose testing as part of a standardized treatment program that also included diet and exercise counseling. During the 6-mo study, both the urine-testing and SMBG groups showed similar improvement in glycemic control; within each group, there were significant improvements in fasting plasma glucose (reduction of 1.4 +/- 3.2 mM, P less than 0.03) and glycosylated hemoglobin (reduction of 2.0 +/- 3.4%, P less than 0.01) levels. Seventeen (31%) of 54 patients actually normalized their glycosylated hemoglobin values, 9 in the urine-testing group and 8 in the SMBG group. Comparisons between the urine-testing and SMBG groups showed no significant differences in mean fasting plasma glucose (P greater than 0.86), glycosylated hemoglobin (P greater than 0.95), or weight (P greater than 0.19). In patients with type II diabetes mellitus not treated with insulin, SMBG is no more effective, but is 8-12 times more expensive, than urine testing in facilitating improved glycemic control. Our results do not support widespread use of SMBG in diabetic patients not treated with insulin.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Allen, BT; DeLong, ER; Feussner, JR

Published Date

  • October 1990

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 13 / 10

Start / End Page

  • 1044 - 1050

PubMed ID

  • 2170088

Pubmed Central ID

  • 2170088

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0149-5992

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.2337/diacare.13.10.1044

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States