Protective effect of CRHR1 gene variants on the development of adult depression following childhood maltreatment: replication and extension.

Published

Journal Article

A previous study reported a gene x environment interaction in which a haplotype in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 gene (CRHR1) was associated with protection against adult depressive symptoms in individuals who were maltreated as children (as assessed by the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire [CTQ]).To replicate the interaction between childhood maltreatment and a TAT haplotype formed by rs7209436, rs110402, and rs242924 in CRHR1, predicting adult depression.Two prospective longitudinal cohort studies.England and New Zealand.Participants in the first sample were women in the E-Risk Study (N = 1116), followed up to age 40 years with 96% retention. Participants in the second sample were men and women in the Dunedin Study (N = 1037), followed up to age 32 years with 96% retention. Main Outcome Measure Research diagnoses of past-year and recurrent major depressive disorder.In the E-Risk Study, the TAT haplotype was associated with a significant protective effect. In this effect, women who reported childhood maltreatment on the CTQ were protected against depression. In the Dunedin Study, which used a different type of measure of maltreatment, this finding was not replicated.A haplotype in CRHR1 has been suggested to exert a protective effect against adult depression among research participants who reported maltreatment on the CTQ, a measure that elicits emotional memories. This suggests the hypothesis that CRHR1's protective effect may relate to its function in the consolidation of memories of emotionally arousing experiences.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Polanczyk, G; Caspi, A; Williams, B; Price, TS; Danese, A; Sugden, K; Uher, R; Poulton, R; Moffitt, TE

Published Date

  • September 2009

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 66 / 9

Start / End Page

  • 978 - 985

PubMed ID

  • 19736354

Pubmed Central ID

  • 19736354

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1538-3636

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0003-990X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2009.114

Language

  • eng