Nanoporous microbead supported bilayers: Stability, physical characterization, and incorporation of functional transmembrane proteins

The introduction of functional transmembrane proteins into supported bilayer-based biomimetic systems presents a significant challenge for biophysics. Among the various methods for producing supported bilayers, liposomal fusion offers a versatile method for the introduction of membrane proteins into supported bilayers on a variety of substrates. In this study, the properties of protein containing unilamellar phosphocholine lipid bilayers on nanoporous silica microspheres are investigated. The effects of the silica substrate, pore structure, and the substrate curvature on the stability of the membrane and the functionality of the membrane protein are determined. Supported bilayers on porous silica microspheres show a significant increase in surface area on surfaces with structures in excess of 10 nm as well as an overall decrease in stability resulting from increasing pore size and curvature. Comparison of the liposomal and detergent-mediated introduction of purified bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and the human type 3 serotonin receptor (5HT3R) are investigated focusing on the resulting protein function, diffusion, orientation, and incorporation efficiency. In both cases, functional proteins are observed; however, the reconstitution efficiency and orientation selectivity are significantly enhanced through detergent-mediated protein reconstitution. The results of these experiments provide a basis for bulk ionic and fluorescent dye-based compartmentalization assays as well as single-molecule optical and single-channel electrochemical interrogation of transmembrane proteins in a biomimetic platform. © 2007 American Chemical Society.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Davis, RW; Flores, A; Barrick, TA; Cox, JM; Brozik, SM; Lopez, GP; Brozik, JA

Published Date

  • 2007

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 23 / 7

Start / End Page

  • 3864 - 3872

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0743-7463

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1021/la062576t

Citation Source

  • SciVal