Seasonality, sociality, and reproduction: Long-term stressors of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

Journal Article

Fecal glucocorticoid (fGC) concentrations are reliable, non-invasive indices of physiological stress that provide insight into an animal's energetic and social demands. To better characterize the long-term stressors in adult members of a female-dominant, seasonally breeding species - the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) - we first validated fecal samples against serum samples and then examined the relationship between fGC concentrations and seasonal, social, demographic, genetic, and reproductive variables. Between 1999 and 2006, we collected 1386 fecal samples from 32 adult, semi-free-ranging animals of both sexes. In males and non-pregnant, non-lactating females, fGC concentrations were significantly elevated during the breeding season, specifically during periods surrounding known conceptions. Moreover, group composition (e.g., multi-male versus one-male) significantly predicted the fGC concentrations of males and females in all reproductive states. In particular, the social instability introduced by intra-male competition likely created a stressor for all animals. We found no relationship, however, between fGC and the sex, age, or heterozygosity of animals. In reproducing females, fGC concentrations were significantly greater during lactation than during the pre-breeding period. During pregnancy, fGC concentrations were elevated in mid-ranking dams, relative to dominant or subordinate dams, and significantly greater during the third trimester than during the first or second trimesters. Thus, in the absence of nutritional stressors, social dominance was a relatively poor predictor of fGC in this female-dominant species. Instead, the animals were maximally challenged by their social circumstances and reproductive events-males by competition for mating opportunities and females by late-term gestation and lactation.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Starling, AP; Charpentier, MJE; Fitzpatrick, C; Scordato, ES; Drea, CM

Published Date

  • January 2010

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 57 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 76 - 85

PubMed ID

  • 19804779

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1095-6867

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2009.09.016

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States