Impact of anemia in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention: analysis from the Controlled Abciximab and Device Investigation to Lower Late Angioplasty Complications (CADILLAC) Trial.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVES: We sought to investigate the impact of anemia in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). BACKGROUND: The prognostic importance of anemia on primary PCI outcomes is unknown. METHODS: In the Controlled Abciximab and Device Investigation to Lower Late Angioplasty Complications (CADILLAC) trial, 2,082 patients of any age with AMI within 12 h onset undergoing primary PCI were randomized to balloon angioplasty versus stenting, each +/- abciximab. Outcomes were stratified by the presence of anemia at baseline, as defined by World Health Organization criteria (hematocrit <39% for men and <36% for women). RESULTS: Anemia was present in 260 (12.8%) of 2,027 randomized patients with baseline laboratory values. Patients with versus without baseline anemia more frequently developed in-hospital hemorrhagic complications (6.2% vs. 2.4%, p = 0.002), had higher rates of blood product transfusions (13.1% vs. 3.1%, p < 0.0001), and had a prolonged (median 4.1 vs. 3.5 days, p < 0.0001) and more expensive (median costs $12,434 vs. $11,603, p = 0.002) index hospitalization. Patients with versus without anemia had strikingly higher mortality during hospitalization (4.6% vs. 1.1%, p = 0.0003), at 30 days (5.8% vs. 1.5%, p < 0.0001), and at 1 year (9.4% vs. 3.5%, p < 0.0001). The rates of disabling stroke at 30 days (0.8% vs. 0.1%, p = 0.005) and at 1 year (2.1% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.0007) were also significantly higher in patients with anemia. By multivariate analysis, anemia was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (hazard ratio, 3.26; p = 0.048) and one-year mortality (hazard ratio, 2.38; p = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: Anemia at baseline in patients with AMI undergoing primary PCI is common, and is strongly associated with adverse outcomes and increased mortality.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Nikolsky, E; Aymong, ED; Halkin, A; Grines, CL; Cox, DA; Garcia, E; Mehran, R; Tcheng, JE; Griffin, JJ; Guagliumi, G; Stuckey, T; Turco, M; Cohen, DA; Negoita, M; Lansky, AJ; Stone, GW

Published Date

  • August 2004

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 44 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 547 - 553

PubMed ID

  • 15358018

Pubmed Central ID

  • 15358018

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1558-3597

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0735-1097

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.jacc.2004.03.080

Language

  • eng