Late second trimester assessment of pyelectasis (SERP) to predict pediatric urological outcome is improved by checking additional features.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVE: Counseling for pyelectasis in the late 2nd trimester is usually based only upon assessing the antero-posterior (AP) width of the renal pelvis. We hypothesized that checking additional features would better predict postnatal outcome. STUDY DESIGN: Ultrasound (<24 weeks gestational age (GA)) and newborn outcome data collected prospectively since 1986 were analyzed retrospectively. We determined if outcome predictions in kidneys with a sonographically evident renal pelvis (SERP), which had evaluation of additional features (e.g., renal and bladder lengths, presence of a dilated ureter or dilated calyces) are more accurate than those that did not have these features. RESULTS: There were 286 fetuses studied with pediatric follow-up of an average of 6.5 years. There were 338 exams providing 459 ultrasound images with SERP. Additional features were not assessed in 183 fetuses; however 103 fetuses did have evaluation of additional features. These features were categorized as abnormal (92) or as normal (11). Fetuses with SERP and abnormal additional features required extensive urological care or died 6.1 times more often than fetuses in which additional features were not examined (p < 0.001) and 12.9 times more often when additional features were normal (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Fetal kidneys with SERP (<24 weeks GA) and an abnormal additional ultrasound feature had extensive pediatric care significantly more often than when such features were not evaluated or were normal.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Maizels, M; Wang, E; Sabbagha, RE; Dinsmoor, M; Seshadri, R; Ginsberg, N; Gauthier, D; Abramowicz, J

Published Date

  • May 2006

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 19 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 295 - 303

PubMed ID

  • 16753770

Pubmed Central ID

  • 16753770

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1476-7058

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1080/14767050600553225

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England