Cytologic features of adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified, in conventional smears: comparison of cases that performed poorly with those that performed well in the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in cervicovaginal cytology.

Published

Journal Article

CONTEXT: Characteristic cytologic features have been identified that distinguish cases that are consistently identified from those that are sometimes missed in the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytology Program for a variety of different lesions and preparations. OBJECTIVES: To compare the cytologic features of cases of adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified (NOS), in conventional smears that perform poorly and well. DESIGN: The cytologic features of 21 conventional smear cases of adenocarcinoma, NOS, that performed poorly in the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program were compared with 17 cases that performed extremely well. RESULTS: Cases that performed well were significantly more likely to have greater than 1000 abnormal cells (P = .006), greater than 100 large abnormal cells (P = .006), large nuclei (P < .001), marked nuclear atypia (P = .02), and hyperchromasia (P = .02). Repair-like features were rare in both groups and were not significant (P = .71). CONCLUSION: Conventional smears with a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma that were consistently identified were significantly more likely to have more abnormal cells, larger abnormal cells, larger nuclei, marked atypia, and hyperchromasia than cases that performed poorly.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Renshaw, AA; Schwartz, MR; Wang, E; Haja, J; Hughes, JH

Published Date

  • January 2006

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 130 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 23 - 26

PubMed ID

  • 16390233

Pubmed Central ID

  • 16390233

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1543-2165

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1043/1543-2165(2006)130[23:CFOANO]2.0.CO;2

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States