Carbohydrate restriction, prostate cancer growth, and the insulin-like growth factor axis.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests carbohydrate intake may influence prostate cancer biology. We tested whether a no-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (NCKD) would delay prostate cancer growth relative to Western and low-fat diets in a xenograft model. METHODS: Seventy-five male SCID mice were fed a NCKD (84% fat-0% carbohydrate-16% protein kcal), low-fat (12% fat-72% carbohydrate-16% protein kcal), or Western diet (40% fat-44% carbohydrate-16% protein kcal). Low-fat mice were fed ad libitum and the other arms fed via a modified-paired feeding protocol. After 24 days, all mice were injected with LAPC-4 cells and sacrificed when tumors approached 1,000 mm(3). RESULTS: Despite consuming equal calories, NCKD-fed mice lost weight (up to 15% body weight) relative to low-fat and Western diet-fed mice and required additional kcal to equalize body weight. Fifty-one days after injection, NCKD mice tumor volumes were 33% smaller than Western mice (rank-sum, P = 0.009). There were no differences in tumor volume between low-fat and NCKD mice. Dietary treatment was significantly associated with survival (log-rank, P = 0.006), with the longest survival among the NCKD mice, followed by the low-fat mice. Serum IGFBP-3 was highest and IGF-1:IGFBP-3 ratio was lowest among NCKD mice while serum insulin and IGF-1 levels were highest in Western mice. NCKD mice had significantly decreased hepatic fatty infiltration relative to the other arms. CONCLUSIONS: In this xenograft model, despite consuming more calories, NCKD-fed mice had significantly reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival relative to Western mice and was associated with favorable changes in serum insulin and IGF axis hormones relative to low-fat or Western diet.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Freedland, SJ; Mavropoulos, J; Wang, A; Darshan, M; Demark-Wahnefried, W; Aronson, WJ; Cohen, P; Hwang, D; Peterson, B; Fields, T; Pizzo, SV; Isaacs, WB

Published Date

  • January 1, 2008

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 68 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 11 - 19

PubMed ID

  • 17999389

Pubmed Central ID

  • 17999389

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0270-4137

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/pros.20683

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States