Role of mast cells in inflammatory bowel disease and inflammation-associated colorectal neoplasia in IL-10-deficient mice.

Published online

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is hypothesized to result from stimulation of immune responses against resident intestinal bacteria within a genetically susceptible host. Mast cells may play a critical role in IBD pathogenesis, since they are typically located just beneath the intestinal mucosal barrier and can be activated by bacterial antigens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study investigated effects of mast cells on inflammation and associated neoplasia in IBD-susceptible interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice with and without mast cells. IL-10-deficient mast cells produced more pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro both constitutively and when triggered, compared with wild type mast cells. However despite this enhanced in vitro response, mast cell-sufficient Il10(-/-) mice actually had decreased cecal expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interferon (IFN)-gamma mRNA, suggesting that mast cells regulate inflammation in vivo. Mast cell deficiency predisposed Il10(-/-) mice to the development of spontaneous colitis and resulted in increased intestinal permeability in vivo that preceded the development of colon inflammation. However, mast cell deficiency did not affect the severity of IBD triggered by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAID) exposure or helicobacter infection that also affect intestinal permeability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mast cells thus appear to have a primarily protective role within the colonic microenvironment by enhancing the efficacy of the mucosal barrier. In addition, although mast cells were previously implicated in progression of sporadic colon cancers, mast cells did not affect the incidence or severity of colonic neoplasia in this inflammation-associated model.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Chichlowski, M; Westwood, GS; Abraham, SN; Hale, LP

Published Date

  • August 17, 2010

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 5 / 8

Start / End Page

  • e12220 -

PubMed ID

  • 20808919

Pubmed Central ID

  • 20808919

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1932-6203

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1371/journal.pone.0012220

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States