Patient survival characteristics after routine mitral valve repair for ischemic mitral regurgitation.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Ischemic mitral regurgitation has been associated with diminished survival compared with nonischemic mitral regurgitation. Conversion from mitral valve replacement to valve repair has improved prognosis, but it is unclear whether ischemic mitral regurgitation remains an independent predictor of outcome after mitral valve repair. METHODS: Five hundred thirty-five patients undergoing mitral valve repair (primarily rigid ring annuloplasty) with or without coronary bypass from 1993 through 2002 were reviewed retrospectively (ischemic mitral regurgitation, n = 141; nonischemic mitral regurgitation, n = 394). A Cox proportional hazards model evaluated survival as a function of 9 simultaneous covariates: ischemic versus nonischemic mitral regurgitation, age, sex, number of medical comorbidities, ejection fraction, New York Heart Association class, coronary disease, reoperation, and year of operation. RESULTS: According to univariable analysis, patients with ischemic mitral regurgitation had greater age, higher comorbidity, lower ejection fraction, higher New York Heart Association, and higher reoperation rate (all P < .001) compared with those having nonischemic mitral regurgitation. Univariable 30-day mortality was as follows: 4.3% for patients with ischemic mitral regurgitation versus 1.3% for patients with nonischemic mitral regurgitation (P = .01). Unadjusted 5-year mortality was as follows: 44% +/- 5% for patients with ischemic mitral regurgitation versus 16% +/- 3% for patients with nonischemic mitral regurgitation (P < .001). In the multivariable model, however, only the number of preoperative comorbidities and advanced age were independent predictors of survival (P < .0001), whereas ischemic mitral regurgitation, sex, ejection fraction, New York Heart Association class, coronary disease, reoperation, and year of operation did not achieve significance (all P > .19). After being adjusted for differences in all preoperative risk factors, survival was not statistically different between ischemic mitral regurgitation and nonischemic mitral regurgitation (P = .33). CONCLUSIONS: With routine application of rigid ring annuloplasty, long-term patient survival is more influenced by baseline patient characteristics and comorbidity than by ischemic cause of mitral regurgitation per se. Future risk assessment and decision making should be based on patient condition and should not be biased by ischemic cause of mitral regurgitation.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Glower, DD; Tuttle, RH; Shaw, LK; Orozco, RE; Rankin, JS

Published Date

  • April 2005

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 129 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 860 - 868

PubMed ID

  • 15821655

Pubmed Central ID

  • 15821655

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1097-685X

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0022-5223

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2004.11.023

Language

  • eng