A new technique to acquire additional liver volume for left lobe graft in living donor liver transplantation.

Published

Journal Article (Academic article)

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Left lobe graft is an ideal option to minimize potential risk for the donor in adult living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT). However, its use is restricted due to size limitations. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a new technique for the acquisition of additional liver volume for left lobe graft. METHODOLOGY: Three donors underwent left hepatic lobectomy by exploiting a new technique as follows: a demarcation line was marked by clamping the right first Glisson's pedicle. A parenchymal transection plane was located 1 cm right side from the demarcation line and just on the left side of the right anterior Glisson's pedicle. A part of the anterior segment added to the left lobe graft by this procedure belonged to right anterior segment by preoperative CT. The preoperative volumetry of the liver was performed using the 3D-CT software, which was able to calculate total liver volume and the volume of each vessel's territories. Additional liver volume was calculated by preoperative CT scan and defined as part of the perfusion area by the right anterior portal branch. Blood perfusion of the additional liver area was postoperatively assessed by dynamic CT, and graft outcome was also evaluated. RESULTS: An additional gain ranged from 40 mL to 51 mL (mean 41.8 mL). GV/SLV was 35.7, 60.0, and 41.0%. The rate of additional volume in GV/SLV ranged from 7.2-8.4% (mean 7.6%). All grafts functioned well. The CT scan performed on early postoperative period confirmed excellent blood perfusion the additional segment. No complication attributable to small-for-size graft was noted. CONCLUSIONS: This new technique for left lobe graft harvesting proved a promising approach to gain additional volume, thereby avoiding small-for-size graft in adult LDLT.

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Imura, S; Shimada, M; Miyake, K; Ikemoto, T; Morine, Y; Yoshizumi, T

Published Date

  • January 2009

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 55 / 85

Start / End Page

  • 1206 - 1210

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0172-6390

Language

  • English