Reduction in consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with weight loss: the PREMIER trial.

Published

Journal Article

Consumption of liquid calories from beverages has increased in parallel with the obesity epidemic in the US population, but their causal relation remains unclear.The objective of this study was to examine how changes in beverage consumption affect weight change among adults.This was a prospective study of 810 adults participating in the PREMIER trial, an 18-mo randomized, controlled, behavioral intervention trial. Measurements (weight, height, and 24-h dietary recall) were made at baseline, 6 mo, and 18 mo.Baseline mean intake of liquid calories was 356 kcal/d (19% of total energy intake). After potential confounders and intervention assignment were controlled for, a reduction in liquid calorie intake of 100 kcal/d was associated with a weight loss of 0.25 kg (95% CI: 0.11, 0.39; P < 0.001) at 6 mo and of 0.24 kg (95% CI: 0.06, 0.41; P = 0.008) at 18 mo. A reduction in liquid calorie intake had a stronger effect than did a reduction in solid calorie intake on weight loss. Of the individual beverages, only intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) was significantly associated with weight change. A reduction in SSB intake of 1 serving/d was associated with a weight loss of 0.49 kg (95% CI: 0.11, 0.82; P = 0.006) at 6 mo and of 0.65 kg (95% CI: 0.22, 1.09; P = 0.003) at 18 mo.These data support recommendations to limit liquid calorie intake among adults and to reduce SSB consumption as a means to accomplish weight loss or avoid excess weight gain. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00000616.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Chen, L; Appel, LJ; Loria, C; Lin, P-H; Champagne, CM; Elmer, PJ; Ard, JD; Mitchell, D; Batch, BC; Svetkey, LP; Caballero, B

Published Date

  • May 2009

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 89 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 1299 - 1306

PubMed ID

  • 19339405

Pubmed Central ID

  • 19339405

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1938-3207

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0002-9165

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.3945/ajcn.2008.27240

Language

  • eng