The effects of providing lung age and respiratory symptoms feedback on community college smokers' perceived smoking-related health risks, worries and desire to quit.

Journal Article

This study examined the effects of providing lung age, as assessed via a lung function test (spirometry), and respiratory symptoms feedback on college smokers' perceived smoking-related risks, worries and desire to quit. We also investigated whether smokers reacted defensively to this feedback. One hundred and twenty-four smokers were randomized to either receive lung age and respiratory symptoms feedback (intervention group) or a brochure containing facts about smoking only (control group). Perceived risks, worries and desire to quit did not differ between groups. In both groups, worries, but not perceived risks, were correlated with a stronger desire to quit. With increasing lung age, smokers rated the feedback as less relevant and reported exerting less effort breathing in and out while undergoing spirometry. The latter two outcomes were associated with less worry. These findings suggest that lung age and respiratory symptoms feedback does not translate readily into appreciable changes in motivation to quit as well as do other often reported mediators of change (e.g., perceived risks and worries).

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Lipkus, IM; Prokhorov, AV

Published Date

  • March 2007

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 32 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 516 - 532

PubMed ID

  • 16824688

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0306-4603

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.addbeh.2006.05.018

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England