Substance abuse and rehabilitation: responding to the global burden of diseases attributable to substance abuse.

Published

Journal Article

Alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use are pervasive throughout the world. Substance use problems are among the major contributors to the global disease burden, which includes disability and mortality. The benefits of treatment far outweigh the economic costs. Despite the availability of treatment services, however, the vast majority of people with substance use disorders do not seek or use treatment. Barriers to and unmet need for evidence-based treatment are widespread even in the United States. Women, adolescents, and young adults are especially vulnerable to adverse effects from substance abuse, but they face additional barriers to getting evidence-based treatment or other social/medical services. Substance use behaviors and the diseases attributable to substance use problems are preventable and modifiable. Yet the ever-changing patterns of substance use and associated problems require combined research and policy-making efforts from all parts of the world to establish a viable knowledge base to inform for prevention, risk-reduction intervention, effective use of evidence-based treatment, and rehabilitation for long-term recovery. The new international, open-access, peer-reviewed Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation (SAR) journal strives to provide an effective platform for sharing ideas for solutions and disseminating research findings globally. Substance use behaviors and problems have no boundaries. The journal welcomes papers from all regions of the world that address any aspect of substance use, abuse/dependence, intervention, treatment, and policy. The "open-access" journal makes cutting edge knowledge freely available to practitioners and researchers worldwide, and this is particularly important for addressing the global disease burden attributable to substance abuse.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Wu, L-T

Published Date

  • October 2010

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 2010 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 5 - 11

PubMed ID

  • 21709730

Pubmed Central ID

  • 21709730

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1179-8467

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.2147/SAR.S14898

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • New Zealand