Psychological correlates of obese patients seeking surgical or residential behavioral weight loss treatment.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the psychological factors related to obese individuals self-selecting for either a residential cognitive-behavioral-based program or surgical treatment program for weight loss. METHODS: Two patient samples with a body mass index of > or =35 kg/m(2) were administered a battery of psychological questionnaires, including the Beck Depression Inventory, Binge Eating Scale, and Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite, at the evaluation for entry into either a surgical weight loss treatment program (n = 76) or cognitive-behavioral-based weight loss treatment program (n = 101). RESULTS: No significant difference was found in the mean body mass index of the 2 samples. No significant difference was found in the self-reported level of depressive symptoms of the 2 samples, with both samples obtaining a mean depressive symptom score in the mild range. Surgical treatment seekers, however, reported significantly greater emotional eating and attributed greater impairment in their quality of life to their weight. CONCLUSION: Individuals seeking a surgical approach to weight loss might perceive their weight as having a greater negative impact on their life than those selecting a residential behavioral lifestyle change approach, even when their weight and depressive symptoms are equivalent. Therefore, an individual's own cognitive appraisal of the negative consequences of their weight might correlate with their treatment choice.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Stout, AL; Applegate, KL; Friedman, KE; Grant, JP; Musante, GJ

Published Date

  • May 2007

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 3 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 369 - 375

PubMed ID

  • 17533101

Pubmed Central ID

  • 17533101

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1878-7533

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1550-7289

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.soard.2007.03.003

Language

  • eng