Methylphenidate effects on functional outcomes in the Preschoolers with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Treatment Study (PATS).

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of methylphenidate (MPH) on functional outcomes, including children's social skills, classroom behavior, emotional status, and parenting stress, during the 4-week, double-blind placebo controlled phase of the Preschoolers with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Treatment Study (PATS). METHODS: A total of 114 preschoolers who had improved with acute MPH treatment, were randomized to their best MPH dose (M = 14.22 mg/day; n = 63) or placebo (PL; n = 51). Assessments included the Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S), parent and teacher versions of the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD-Symptoms and Normal Behaviors (SWAN), Social Competence Scale (SCS), Social Skills Rating System (SSRS), and Early Childhood Inventory (ECI), and Parenting Stress Index (PSI). RESULTS: Medication effects varied by informant and outcome measure. Parent measures and teacher SWAN scores did not differentially improve with MPH. Parent-rated depression (p < 0.02) and dysthymia (p < 0.001) on the ECI worsened with MPH, but scores were not in the clinical range. Significant medication effects were found on clinician CGI-S (p < 0.0001) and teacher social competence ratings (SCS, p < 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Preschoolers with ADHD treated with MPH for 4 weeks improve in some aspects of functioning. Additional improvements might require longer treatment, higher doses, and/or intensive behavioral treatment in combination with medication.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Abikoff, HB; Vitiello, B; Riddle, MA; Cunningham, C; Greenhill, LL; Swanson, JM; Chuang, SZ; Davies, M; Kastelic, E; Wigal, SB; Evans, L; Ghuman, JK; Kollins, SH; McCracken, JT; McGough, JJ; Murray, DW; Posner, K; Skrobala, AM; Wigal, T

Published Date

  • October 2007

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 17 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 581 - 592

PubMed ID

  • 17979579

Pubmed Central ID

  • 17979579

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1044-5463

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1089/cap.2007.0068

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States