Laboratory markers of cardiovascular risk in pediatric SLE: the APPLE baseline cohort.

Published

Journal Article

As part of the Atherosclerosis Prevention in Pediatric Lupus Erythematosus (APPLE) Trial, a prospective multicenter cohort of 221 children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (mean age 15.7 years, 83% female) underwent baseline measurement of markers of cardiovascular risk, including fasting levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglycerides (TG), lipoprotein A (Lpa), homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). A cross-sectional analysis of the baseline laboratory values and clinical characteristics of this cohort was performed. Univariable relationships between the cardiovascular markers of interest and clinical variables were assessed, followed by multivariable linear regression modeling. Mean levels of LDL, HDL, Lpa, TG, hs-CRP and homocysteine were in the normal or borderline ranges. In multivariable analysis, increased Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), prednisone dose, and hypertension (HTN) were independently associated with higher LDL levels. Higher hs-CRP and creatinine clearance were independently related to lower HDL levels. Higher body mass index (BMI), prednisone dose, and homocysteine levels were independently associated with higher TG levels. Only Hispanic or non-White status predicted higher Lpa levels. Proteinuria, higher TG and lower creatinine clearance were independently associated with higher homocysteine levels, while use of multivitamin with folate predicted lower homocysteine levels. Higher BMI, lower HDL, and longer SLE disease duration, but not SLEDAI, were independently associated with higher hs-CRP levels. The R(2) for these models ranged from 7% to 23%. SLE disease activity as measured by the SLEDAI was associated only with higher LDL levels and not with hs-CRP. Markers of renal injury (HTN, proteinuria, and creatinine clearance) were independently associated with levels of LDL, HDL, and homocysteine, highlighting the importance of renal status in the cardiovascular health of children and adolescents with SLE. Future longitudinal analysis of the APPLE cohort is needed to further examine these relationships.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Ardoin, SP; Schanberg, LE; Sandborg, C; Yow, E; Barnhart, HX; Mieszkalski, KL; Ilowite, NT; von Scheven, E; Eberhard, A; Levy, DM; Kimura, Y; Silverman, E; Bowyer, SL; Punaro, L; Singer, NG; Sherry, DD; McCurdy, D; Klein-Gitelman, M; Wallace, C; Silver, R; Wagner-Weiner, L; Higgins, GC; Brunner, HI; Jung, LK; Imundo, L; Soep, JB; Reed, AM; APPLE investigators,

Published Date

  • October 2010

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 19 / 11

Start / End Page

  • 1315 - 1325

PubMed ID

  • 20861207

Pubmed Central ID

  • 20861207

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1477-0962

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1177/0961203310373937

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England