Indications for and outcomes of repeat penetrating keratoplasty, 1989-1995.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the indications for and outcomes of repeat penetrating keratoplasty over a 7-year period and compare them to a similar study over the prior 6-year period at the same institution. DESIGN: Retrospective noncomparative case series. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred twenty-three consecutive repeat corneal transplants performed by one of five corneal surgeons between 1989 and 1995 were studied. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reasons for primary and regraft failure, indications for the initial corneal graft, graft clarity, and best-corrected visual acuity were measured on each patient. RESULTS: Between 1989 and 1995, 16% (271 of 1689) of transplants performed by our cornea group were regrafts compared with 9% (165 of 1860) in the period from 1983 to 1988 (P < 0.01). The most common indications for penetrating keratoplasty before regraft were pseudophakic bullous keratopathy (27%, 61 of 223), failed graft (20%, 44 of 223), Fuchs' dystrophy (11%, 24 of 223), aphakic bullous keratopathy (9%, 21 of 223), keratoconus (8%, 17 of 223), and herpes simplex keratitis (6%, 14 of 223). Compared with the prior study period of 1983 to 1988, an increase was revealed in the incidence of failed graft (11% to 20%, P = 0.03), and a decrease was revealed in the incidence of aphakic bullous keratopathy (19% to 9%, P = 0.01). Of the 223 regrafts, 55 (25%) failed during the study period (range, 1 month to 7.5 years; mean 2.1 years). Eleven percent (6 of 55) of regraft failures occurred within 6 months, and 55% (30 of 55) failed within 18 months. Of the 150 regrafts with 2 years follow-up (mean, 3.9 years), 111 (74%) had clear grafts. A best-corrected visual acuity of 20/20 to 20/40 was achieved in 41% (46 of 111), 20/50 to 20/100 in 32% (36 of 111), 20/200 to 20/400 in 21% (23 of 111), and counting fingers to no light perception in 5% (6 of 111). CONCLUSIONS: Failed grafts are increasing as an indication for penetrating keratoplasty. Graft clarity and visual acuity results continue to be very good, supporting the use of repeat corneal transplantation.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Patel, NP; Kim, T; Rapuano, CJ; Cohen, EJ; Laibson, PR

Published Date

  • April 2000

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 107 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 719 - 724

PubMed ID

  • 10768334

Pubmed Central ID

  • 10768334

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0161-6420

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/s0161-6420(00)00003-8

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States