Association of troponin T, detected with highly sensitive assay, and outcomes in infective endocarditis.

Published

Journal Article

Troponin levels have been correlated with adverse outcomes in multiple disease processes, including congestive heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, sepsis, and, in a few small series, infective endocarditis. We hypothesized that a novel measurement of troponin using a highly sensitive assay would correlate with adverse outcomes when prospectively studied in patients with infective endocarditis. At a single center in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis, 42 patients met the inclusion criteria and underwent testing for cardiac troponin T (cTnT) using both a standard and a highly sensitive precommercial assay. The cTnT levels were associated with the prespecified primary composite outcome of death, central nervous system event, and cardiac abscess. Secondary outcomes included the individual components of the composite outcome and the need for cardiac surgery. A receiver operating characteristic curve was derived and used to identify the optimal cutpoint for cTnT using the highly sensitive assay. cTnT was detectable with the highly sensitive assay in 39 (93%) of 42 patients with infective endocarditis and with the standard assay in 25 (56%) of 42 (p <0.05). Of the 42 patients, 15 experienced the composite outcome, 4 died, 9 had a central nervous system event, and 5 had a cardiac abscess. With the hs-cTnT assay, the median cTnT was greater in the patients who experienced the primary outcome (0.12 vs 0.02 ng/ml, p <0.05). According to the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis (area under the curve of 0.74), cTnT levels of ≥0.08 ng/ml produced optimal specificity (78%) for the primary outcome. The patients with a cTnT level of ≥0.08 ng/ml were more likely to experience the primary outcome (odds ratio 7.0, 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 28.6, p <0.01) and a central nervous system event (odds ratio 9.3, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 24.1, p = 0.02). In conclusion, cTnT is detectable in 93% of patients with infective endocarditis using a novel highly sensitive assay, with higher levels correlating with poor clinical outcomes.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Stancoven, AB; Shiue, AB; Khera, A; Pinkston, K; Hashim, IA; Wang, A; de Lemos, JA; Peterson, GE

Published Date

  • August 1, 2011

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 108 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 416 - 420

PubMed ID

  • 21600535

Pubmed Central ID

  • 21600535

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1879-1913

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.amjcard.2011.03.061

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States