Dynamic perception of facial affect and identity in the human brain.

Published

Journal Article

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to compare brain activation to static facial displays versus dynamic changes in facial identity or emotional expression. Static images depicted prototypical fearful, angry and neutral expressions. Identity morphs depicted identity changes from one person to another, always with neutral expressions. Emotion morphs depicted expression changes from neutral to fear or anger, creating the illusion that the actor was 'getting scared' or 'getting angry' in real-time. Brain regions implicated in processing facial affect, including the amygdala and fusiform gyrus, showed greater responses to dynamic versus static emotional expressions, especially for fear. Identity morphs activated a dorsal fronto-cingulo-parietal circuit and additional ventral areas, including the amygdala, that also responded to the emotion morphs. Activity in the superior temporal sulcus discriminated emotion morphs from identity morphs, extending its known role in processing biologically relevant motion. The results highlight the importance of temporal cues in the neural coding of facial displays.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • LaBar, KS; Crupain, MJ; Voyvodic, JT; McCarthy, G

Published Date

  • October 1, 2003

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 13 / 10

Start / End Page

  • 1023 - 1033

PubMed ID

  • 12967919

Pubmed Central ID

  • 12967919

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1047-3211

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1093/cercor/13.10.1023

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States