Elephant survival, rainfall and the confounding effects of water provision and fences

Published

Journal Article

Elephant are increasing across some areas of Africa leading to concerns that they may reduce woodlands through their feeding. Droughts may help limit elephant numbers, but they are generally both episodic and local. To explore more general impacts of rainfall, we examine how its annual variation influences elephant survival across ten sites. These sites span an almost coast-to-coast transect of southern Africa that holds the majority of the ~500,000 remaining savanna elephants. Elephants born in high rainfall years survive better than elephants born in low rainfall years. The relationship is generally weak, except at the two fenced sites, where rainfall greatly influenced juvenile survival. In these two sites, there are also extensive networks of artificial water. Rainfall likely affects elephant survival through its influence on food. The provision of artificial water opens new areas for elephants in the dry season, while fencing restricts their movements in the wet season. We conclude that the combination of these factors makes elephant survival more susceptible to reductions in rainfall. As a result, elephants living in enclosed reserves may be the first populations to feel the impacts of global warming which will decrease average rainfall and increase the frequency of droughts. A way to prevent these elephants from damaging the vegetation within these enclosed parks is for managers to reduce artificial water sources or, whenever practical, to remove fences. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Shrader, AM; Pimm, SL; van Aarde, RJ

Published Date

  • July 1, 2010

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 19 / 8

Start / End Page

  • 2235 - 2245

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1572-9710

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0960-3115

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/s10531-010-9836-7

Citation Source

  • Scopus