A spatial measure of neighborhood level racial isolation applied to low birthweight, preterm birth, and birthweight in North Carolina.

Published

Journal Article

Research on racial residential segregation (RRS) and birth outcomes has focused on RRS at a broad geographic scale, in an aspatial framework, and in northern US cities. We developed a spatial measure of neighborhood level racial isolation of blacks. We examined the association between this new measure and low birthweight, preterm birth, and birthweight in the southern state of North Carolina. Natality data were obtained from the North Carolina Detailed Birth Record 1998-2002 files. Using multiple regression with cluster corrected standard errors, infants born to black and white mothers living in black isolated neighborhoods had, on average, decreased birthweight, and increased odds of low birthweight and preterm birth compared to their counterparts in less isolated areas. White mothers in predominantly black neighborhoods experienced greater increases in odds of each poor birth outcome than did black mothers. Black isolation may be proxying concentrated socioeconomic disadvantage, including disamenities in the built environment.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Anthopolos, R; James, SA; Gelfand, AE; Miranda, ML

Published Date

  • December 2011

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 2 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 235 - 246

PubMed ID

  • 22748223

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22748223

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1877-5853

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1877-5845

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.sste.2011.06.002

Language

  • eng