The deadly toll of invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in community hospitals.

Published

Journal Article

INTRODUCTION: Data regarding the epidemiology, treatment, and outcomes of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in rural and community hospitals are limited. METHODS: This cohort study was conducted at 1 tertiary care hospital and 8 community hospitals in the southeastern United States. Patients with a surgical site infection (SSI) and/or bacteremia due to MRSA were prospectively identified at each study hospital during the period 1994-2003. RESULTS: A total of 129 patients with SSI and 564 patients with bacteremia due to MRSA were identified. Only 57 patients with SSI (44.2%) received antibiotics active against MRSA on the initial date of diagnosis; only 95 (73.6%) received an agent active against MRSA by day 7 after diagnosis of SSI due to MRSA. Ninety-five patients with SSI due to MRSA (73.6%) were readmitted to the hospital within 90 days after their original surgery. The 1-year mortality rate among patients with SSI due to MRSA was 22%. Inadequate therapy was also commonly given to patients with bacteremia: only 216 (38.3%) received antibiotics active against MRSA on the initial day of infection, and only 383 (67.9%) received an agent active against MRSA by day 7 after diagnosis. Approximately one-third of patients with bloodstream infection died during their initial hospitalization. Patients hospitalized in community hospitals were less likely to receive effective antimicrobial therapy on both the day of infection and within 7 days after infection, compared with patients in the tertiary care hospital. CONCLUSION: Inadequate therapy is commonly administered after diagnosis of SSI and bacteremia due to MRSA in patients in community hospitals.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Kaye, KS; Anderson, DJ; Choi, Y; Link, K; Thacker, P; Sexton, DJ

Published Date

  • May 15, 2008

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 46 / 10

Start / End Page

  • 1568 - 1577

PubMed ID

  • 18419491

Pubmed Central ID

  • 18419491

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1537-6591

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1086/587673

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States