Myeloablative transplantation using either cord blood or bone marrow leads to immune recovery, high long-term donor chimerism and excellent survival in chronic granulomatous disease.

Published

Journal Article

The curative potential of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with chronic granulomatous disease depends on availability of a suitable donor, successful donor engraftment, and maintenance of long-term donor chimerism. Twelve consecutive children (median age, 59.5 months; range, 8-140 months) with severe chronic granulomatous disease (serious bacterial/fungal infections pretransplantation; median, 3; range, 2-9) received myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using sibling bone marrow ([SibBM]; n = 5), unrelated cord blood (UCB; n = 6), and sibling cord blood (n = 1) at our center between 1997 and 2010. SibBM and sibling cord blood were HLA matched at 6/6, whereas UCB were 5/6 (n = 5) or 6/6 (n = 1). Recipients of SibBM were conditioned with busulfan and cyclophosphamide ± anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), whereas 6 of 7 cord blood recipients received fludarabine/busulfan/cyclophosphamide/ATG. Seven patients received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilized granulocyte transfusions from directed donors. The first 2 UCB recipients had primary graft failure but successfully underwent retransplantation with UCB. Highest acute graft-versus-host disease was grade III (n = 1). Extensive chronic graft-vs-host disease developed in 3 patients. All patients are alive with median follow-up of 70.5 months (range, 12-167 months) with high donor chimerism (>98%, n = 10; 94%, n = 1; and 92%, n = 1). Myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation led to correction of neutrophil dysfunction, durable donor chimerism, excellent survival, good quality of life, and low incidence of graft-vs-host disease regardless of graft source.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Tewari, P; Martin, PL; Mendizabal, A; Parikh, SH; Page, KM; Driscoll, TA; Malech, HL; Kurtzberg, J; Prasad, VK

Published Date

  • September 2012

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 18 / 9

Start / End Page

  • 1368 - 1377

PubMed ID

  • 22326631

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22326631

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1523-6536

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1083-8791

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.bbmt.2012.02.002

Language

  • eng