Predictors of primary care physicians' self-reported intention to conduct suicide risk assessments.

Published

Journal Article

Primary care physicians play a significant role in depression care, suicide assessment, and suicide prevention. However, little is known about what factors relate to and predict quality of depression care (assessment, diagnosis, and treatment), including suicide assessment. The authors explored the extent to which select patient and physician factors increase the probability of one element of quality of care: namely, intention to conduct suicide assessment. Data were collected from 404 randomly selected primary care physicians after their interaction with CD-ROM vignettes of actors portraying major depression with moderate levels of severity. The authors examined which patient factors and physician factors increase the likelihood of physicians' intention to conduct a suicide assessment. Data from the study revealed that physician-participants inquired about suicide 36% of the time. A random effects logistic model indicated that several factors were predictive of physicians' intention to conduct a suicide assessment: patient's comorbidity status (odds ratio (OR) = 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.37-1.00), physicians' age (OR = 0.67; 95% CI = 0.49-0.92), physicians' race (OR = 1.84; 95% CI = 1.08-3.13), and how depressed the physician perceived the virtual patient to be (OR = 0.58; 95% CI = 0.39-0.87). A substantial number of primary care physicians in this study indicated they would not assess for suicide, even though most physicians perceived the virtual patient to be depressed or very depressed. Further study is needed to establish factors that may be modified and targeted to increase the likelihood of physicians' providing one element of quality of care--suicide assessment--for depressed patients.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Hooper, LM; Epstein, SA; Weinfurt, KP; DeCoster, J; Qu, L; Hannah, NJ

Published Date

  • April 2012

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 39 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 103 - 115

PubMed ID

  • 22218814

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22218814

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1556-3308

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/s11414-011-9268-5

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States