Adult age differences in functional connectivity during executive control.

Published

Journal Article

Task switching requires executive control processes that undergo age-related decline. Previous neuroimaging studies have identified age-related differences in brain activation associated with global switching effects (dual-task blocks versus single-task blocks), but age-related differences in activation during local switching effects (switch trials versus repeat trials, within blocks) have not been investigated. This experiment used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to examine adult age differences in task switching across adjacent trials (i.e., local task switching). During fMRI scanning, participants performed a cued, word categorization task. From interspersed cue-only trials, switch-related processing associated with the cue was estimated separately from the target. Activation associated with task switching, within a distributed frontoparietal network, differed for cue- and target-related processing. The magnitude of event-related activation for task switching was similar for younger adults (n=20; 18-27years) and older adults (n=20; 60-85years), although activation sustained throughout the on-tasks periods exhibited some age-related decline. Critically, the functional connectivity of switch-related regions, during cue processing, was higher for younger adults than for older adults, whereas functional connectivity during target processing was comparable across the age groups. Further, individual differences in cue-related functional connectivity shared a substantial portion of the age-related variability in the efficiency of target categorization response (drift rate). This age-related difference in functional connectivity, however, was independent of white matter integrity within task-relevant regions. These findings highlight the functional connectivity of frontoparietal activation as a potential source of age-related decline in executive control.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Madden, DJ; Costello, MC; Dennis, NA; Davis, SW; Shepler, AM; Spaniol, J; Bucur, B; Cabeza, R

Published Date

  • August 2010

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 52 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 643 - 657

PubMed ID

  • 20434565

Pubmed Central ID

  • 20434565

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1095-9572

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1053-8119

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.04.249

Language

  • eng