A phantom study on the positioning accuracy of the Novalis Body system.

Published

Journal Article

A phantom study was conducted to investigate inherent positioning accuracy of an image-guided patient positioning system-the Novalis Body system for three-dimensional (3-D) conformal radiotherapy. This positioning system consists of two infrared (IR) cameras and one video camera and two kV x-ray imaging devices. The initial patient setup was guided by the IR camera system and the target localization was accomplished using the kV x-ray imaging system. In this study, the IR marker shift and phantom rotation were simulated and their effects on the positioning accuracy were examined by a Rando phantom. The effects of CT slice thickness and treatment sites on the positioning accuracy were tested. In addition, the internal target shift was simulated and its effect on the positioning accuracy was examined by a water tank. With the application of the Novalis Body system, the positioning error of the planned isocenter was significantly reduced. The experimental results with the simulated IR marker shifts indicated that the positioning errors of the planned isocenter were 0.6 +/- 0.3, 0.5 +/- 0.2, and 0.7 +/- 0.2 mm along the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical axes, respectively. The experimental results with the simulated phantom rotations indicated that the positioning errors of the planned isocenter were 0.6 +/- 0.3, 0.7 +/- 0.2, and 0.5 +/- 0.2 mm along the three axes, respectively. The experimental results with the simulated target shifts indicated that the positioning errors of the planned isocenter were 0.6 +/- 0.3, 0.7 +/- 0.2, and 0.5 +/- 0.2 mm along the three axes, respectively. On average, the positioning accuracy of 1 mm for the planned isocenter was achieved using the Novalis Body system.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Yan, H; Yin, F-F; Kim, JH

Published Date

  • December 2003

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 30 / 12

Start / End Page

  • 3052 - 3060

PubMed ID

  • 14713071

Pubmed Central ID

  • 14713071

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0094-2405

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1118/1.1626122

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States