Can Childhood Factors Predict Workplace Deviance?

Published

Journal Article

Compared to the more common focus on street crime, empirical research on workplace deviance has been hampered by highly select samples, cross-sectional research designs, and limited inclusion of relevant predictor variables that bear on important theoretical debates. A key debate concerns the extent to which childhood conduct-problem trajectories influence crime over the life-course, including adults' workplace crime, whether childhood low self-control is a more important determinant than trajectories, and/or whether each or both of these childhood factors relate to later criminal activity. This paper provides evidence on this debate by examining two types of workplace deviance: production and property deviance separately for males and females. We use data from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, a birth cohort followed into adulthood, to examine how childhood factors (conduct-problem trajectories and low self-control) and then adult job characteristics predict workplace deviance at age 32. Analyses revealed that none of the childhood factors matter for predicting female deviance in the workplace but that conduct-problem trajectories did account for male workplace deviance.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Piquero, NL; Moffitt, TE

Published Date

  • July 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 31 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 664 - 692

PubMed ID

  • 24882937

Pubmed Central ID

  • 24882937

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1745-9109

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0741-8825

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1080/07418825.2012.661446

Language

  • eng