Polygenic risk and the developmental progression to heavy, persistent smoking and nicotine dependence: evidence from a 4-decade longitudinal study.

Published

Journal Article

Genome-wide hypothesis-free discovery methods have identified loci that are associated with heavy smoking in adulthood. Research is needed to understand developmental processes that link newly discovered genetic risks with adult heavy smoking.To test how genetic risks discovered in genome-wide association studies of adult smoking influence the developmental progression of smoking behavior from initiation through conversion to daily smoking, progression to heavy smoking, nicotine dependence, and struggles with cessation.A 38-year, prospective, longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort.The Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study of New Zealand.The study included 1037 male and female participants.We assessed genetic risk with a multilocus genetic risk score. The genetic risk score was composed of single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified in 3 meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies of smoking quantity phenotypes.Smoking initiation, conversion to daily smoking, progression to heavy smoking, nicotine dependence (Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence), and cessation difficulties were evaluated at 8 assessments spanning the ages of 11 to 38 years.Genetic risk score was unrelated to smoking initiation. However, individuals at higher genetic risk were more likely to convert to daily smoking as teenagers, progressed more rapidly from smoking initiation to heavy smoking, persisted longer in smoking heavily, developed nicotine dependence more frequently, were more reliant on smoking to cope with stress, and were more likely to fail in their cessation attempts. Further analysis revealed that 2 adolescent developmental phenotypes-early conversion to daily smoking and rapid progression to heavy smoking-mediated associations between the genetic risk score and mature phenotypes of persistent heavy smoking, nicotine dependence, and cessation failure. The genetic risk score predicted smoking risk over and above family history.Initiatives that disrupt the developmental progression of smoking behavior among adolescents may mitigate genetic risks for developing adult smoking problems. Future genetic research may maximize discovery potential by focusing on smoking behavior soon after smoking initiation and by studying young smokers.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Belsky, DW; Moffitt, TE; Baker, TB; Biddle, AK; Evans, JP; Harrington, H; Houts, R; Meier, M; Sugden, K; Williams, B; Poulton, R; Caspi, A

Published Date

  • May 2013

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 70 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 534 - 542

PubMed ID

  • 23536134

Pubmed Central ID

  • 23536134

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 2168-6238

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 2168-622X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.736

Language

  • eng