Need for global partnership in cancer care: perceptions of cancer care researchers attending the 2010 australia and Asia pacific clinical oncology research development workshop.

Published

Journal Article

To understand the diversity of issues and the breadth of growing clinical care, professional education, and clinical research needs of developing countries, not typically represented in Western or European surveys of cancer care and research.A cross-sectional survey was conducted of the attendees at the 2010 Australia and Asia Pacific Clinical Oncology Research Development workshop (Queensland, Australia) about the most important health care questions facing the participant's home countries, especially concerning cancer.Early-career oncologists and advanced oncology trainees from a region of the world containing significant low- and middle-income countries reported that cancer is an emerging health priority as a result of aging of the population, the impact of diet and lifestyle, and environmental pollution. There was concern about the capacity of health care workers and treatment facilities to provide cancer care and access to the latest cancer therapies and technologies. Although improving health care delivery was seen as a critical local agenda priority, focusing on improved cancer research activities in this select population was seen as the best way that others outside the country could improve outcomes for all.The burden of cancer will increase dramatically over the next 20 years, particularly in countries with developing and middle-income economies. Cancer research globally faces significant barriers, many of which are magnified in the developing country setting. Overcoming these barriers will require partnerships sensitive and responsive to both local and global needs.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Lyerly, HK; Abernethy, AP; Stockler, MR; Koczwara, B; Aziz, Z; Nair, R; Seymour, L

Published Date

  • September 2011

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 7 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 324 - 329

PubMed ID

  • 22211131

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22211131

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1935-469X

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1935-469X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1200/JOP.2011.000230

Language

  • eng