Chronic lymphocytic leukemia in African Americans.

Published

Journal Article (Review)

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most prevalent leukemia in the United States with almost 4390 attributable deaths per year. Epidemiologic data compiled by the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program identifies important differences in incidence and survival for African Americans with CLL. Although the incidence of CLL is lower among African Americans than among Caucasians (4.6 and 6.2 per 100 000 men, respectively), age-adjusted survival is inferior. African American patients with CLL are almost twice as likely to die from a CLL-related complication in the first 5 years after diagnosis as are Caucasian patients with CLL. The biologic basis for these observations is almost entirely unexplored, and a comprehensive clinical analysis of African American patients with CLL is lacking. This is the subject of the present review.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Coombs, CC; Falchi, L; Weinberg, JB; Ferrajoli, A; Lanasa, MC

Published Date

  • November 2012

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 53 / 11

Start / End Page

  • 2326 - 2329

PubMed ID

  • 22646816

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22646816

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1029-2403

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.3109/10428194.2012.698276

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States