Chemoattractant-mediated stimulation of the respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes may require appearance of protein kinase activity in the cells' particulate fraction.

Journal Article

Low doses of aliphatic alcohols produce divergent effects on the function of chemoattractant receptors on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) since they enhance chemotaxis but inhibit stimulation of superoxide production by chemoattractants. As such, alcohols can provide useful pharmacologic tools to probe the mechanisms of stimulus-response coupling in leukocytes. A role for protein kinase C has been implicated in the activation of the respiratory burst in PMNs. Although the vast majority of this enzyme activity is located in the cytosolic fraction of unactivated PMNs, protein kinase C activity appears in the particulate fraction of the cells when they are stimulated to produce superoxide by either chemoattractants or by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Doses of the alcohols that selectively inhibited stimulation of superoxide production by chemoattractants also inhibited the appearance of protein kinase C activity as well as an undefined protein kinase activity in the particulate fraction of the cells. In contrast, the alcohols did not affect either the ability of PMA to stimulate the production of superoxide in PMNs nor the appearance of protein kinase activity in the cells' particulate fraction. PMA is known to bind and activate protein kinase C directly, thus bypassing receptor-mediated events. These data suggest that alcohols inhibit the stimulation of the respiratory burst by chemoattractants in PMNs by blocking the ability of receptor occupancy to induce the appearance of protein kinase activity in particulate fractions. These results moreover suggest that the appearance of protein kinase activity in the particulate fraction may be required for activation of the respiratory burst in PMNs.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Pike, MC; Jakoi, L; McPhail, LC; Snyderman, R

Published Date

  • April 1986

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 67 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 909 - 913

PubMed ID

  • 3006835

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0006-4971

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States