Physical function and independence 1 year after myocardial infarction: observations from the Translational Research Investigating Underlying disparities in recovery from acute Myocardial infarction: Patients' Health status registry.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may contribute to health status declines including "independence loss" and "physical function decline." Despite the importance of these outcomes for prognosis and quality of life, their incidence and predictors have not been well described. METHODS: We studied 2,002 patients with AMI enrolled across 24 sites in the TRIUMPH registry who completed assessments of independence and physical function at the time of AMI and 1 year later. Independence was evaluated by the EuroQol-5D (mobility, self-care, and usual activities), and physical function was assessed with the Short Form-12 physical component score. Declines in ≥1 level on EuroQol-5D and >5 points in PCS were considered clinically significant changes. Hierarchical, multivariable, modified Poisson regression models accounting for within-site variability were used to identify predictors of independence loss and physical function decline. RESULTS: One-year post AMI, 43.0% of patients experienced health status declines: 12.8% independence loss alone, 15.2% physical function decline alone, and 15.0% both. After adjustment, variables that predicted independence loss included female sex, nonwhite race, unmarried status, uninsured status, end-stage renal disease, and depression. Variables that predicted physical function decline were uninsured status, lack of cardiac rehabilitation referral, and absence of pre-AMI angina. Age was not predictive of either outcome after adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: >40% of patients experience independence loss or physical function decline 1 year after AMI. These changes are distinct but can occur simultaneously. Although some risk factors are not modifiable, others suggest potential targets for strategies to preserve patients' health status.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Dodson, JA; Arnold, SV; Reid, KJ; Gill, TM; Rich, MW; Masoudi, FA; Spertus, JA; Krumholz, HM; Alexander, KP

Published Date

  • May 2012

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 163 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 790 - 796

PubMed ID

  • 22607856

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22607856

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1097-6744

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.ahj.2012.02.024

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States