Predicting mortality for paediatric inpatients where malaria is uncommon.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVE: As the proportion of children living low malaria transmission areas in sub-Saharan Africa increases, approaches for identifying non-malarial severe illness need to be evaluated to improve child outcomes. DESIGN: As a prospective cohort study, we identified febrile paediatric inpatients, recorded data using Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) criteria, and collected diagnostic specimens. SETTING: Tertiary referral centre, northern Tanzania. RESULTS: Of 466 participants with known outcome, median age was 1.4 years (range 2 months-13.0 years), 200 (42.9%) were female, 11 (2.4%) had malaria and 34 (7.3%) died. Inpatient death was associated with: Capillary refill >3 s (OR 9.0, 95% CI 3.0 to 26.7), inability to breastfeed or drink (OR 8.9, 95% CI 4.0 to 19.6), stiff neck (OR 7.0, 95% CI 2.8 to 17.6), lethargy (OR 5.2, 95% CI 2.5 to 10.6), skin pinch >2 s (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.9 to 12.3), respiratory difficulty (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.9 to 8.2), generalised lymphadenopathy (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 8.3) and oral candidiasis (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.4 to 8.3). BCS <5 (OR 27.2, p<0.001) and severe wasting (OR 6.9, p<0.001) were independently associated with inpatient death. CONCLUSIONS: In a low malaria transmission setting, IMCI criteria performed well for predicting inpatient death from non-malarial illness. Laboratory results were not as useful in predicting death, underscoring the importance of clinical examination in assessing prognosis. Healthcare workers should consider local malaria epidemiology as malaria over-diagnosis in children may delay potentially life-saving interventions in areas where malaria is uncommon.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Clifton, DC; Ramadhani, HO; Msuya, LJ; Njau, BN; Kinabo, GD; Buchanan, AM; Crump, JA

Published Date

  • October 2012

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 97 / 10

Start / End Page

  • 889 - 894

PubMed ID

  • 22872067

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22872067

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1468-2044

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1136/archdischild-2012-301812

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England