Low birth weight is associated with components of the metabolic syndrome

Journal Article

The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between birth weight and number of metabolic syndrome (MetS) components in an urban Chinese cohort. Individuals (N = 2019) who were born between 1921 and 1954 at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital and who had detailed obstetric records volunteered to take part and were examined by medical personnel in a clinical setting between May 2003 and April 2005. Data of birth outcome and results on clinic examination in adulthood were analyzed using analysis of variance and multivariate ordinal regression to estimate the association between birth weight and MetS. Metabolic syndrome was defined as per the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. The prevalence of MetS was 26.74%, whereas 55.43% of the subjects had at least 2 components of MetS. Subjects who presented with all 5 components of MetS exhibited a significantly lower birth weight and higher age, body mass index, and waist circumference at follow-up. Multivariate ordinal regression analysis revealed that, as compared with those with birth weights of 3000 to 3500 g, subjects who had birth weights of less than 2500 g were 66% more likely to develop a greater number of MetS components in adulthood (95% confidence interval, 1.18-2.34; P = .004), whereas those with birth weights between 2500 and 3000 g were 33% more likely to develop a greater number of MetS components as adults (95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.63; P = .005). The present study demonstrated the relationship between low birth weight and increased presentation of MetS components in Chinese adults. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Xiao, X; Zhang, Z-X; Li, W-H; Feng, K; Sun, Q; Cohen, HJ; Xu, T; Wang, H; Liu, A-M; Gong, X-M; Shen, Y; Yi, Z

Published Date

  • 2010

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 59 / 9

Start / End Page

  • 1282 - 1286

PubMed ID

  • 20045533

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0026-0495

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.metabol.2009.12.001