Severity of 12-month DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement.

Published

Journal Article

Estimates of DSM-IV disorder prevalence are high; stringent criteria to define need for services are desired.To present US national data on the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of 12-month serious emotional disturbance (SED), defined by the US Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement.The National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement is a national survey of DSM-IV anxiety, mood, behavior, and substance disorders among US adolescents.Dual-frame household and school samples of US adolescents.Total of 6483 pairs of adolescents aged 13 to 17 (interviews) and parents (questionnaires).The DSM-IV disorders were assessed with the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview and validated with blinded clinical interviews based on the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children. Serious emotional disturbance was operationalized as a DSM-IV/Composite International Diagnostic Interview disorder with a score of 50 or less on the Children's Global Assessment Scale (ie, moderate impairment in most areas of functioning or severe impairment in at least 1 area). Concordance of Composite International Diagnostic Interview SED diagnoses with blinded Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children diagnoses was good.The estimated prevalence of SED was 8.0%. Most SEDs were due to behavior (54.5%) or mood (31.4%) disorders. Although respondents with 3 or more disorders made up only 29.0% of those with 12-month DSM-IV/Composite International Diagnostic Interview disorders, they constituted 63.5% of SEDs. Predictive effects of high comorbidity were significantly greater than the product of their disorder-specific odds ratios and consistent across disorder types. Associations of sociodemographic variables with SED were generally nonsignificant after controlling for disorder type and number.The high estimated 12-month prevalence of DSM-IV disorders among US adolescents is largely due to mild cases. The significant between-disorder differences in risk of SED and the significant effect of high comorbidity have important public health implications for targeting interventions.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Kessler, RC; Avenevoli, S; Costello, J; Green, JG; Gruber, MJ; McLaughlin, KA; Petukhova, M; Sampson, NA; Zaslavsky, AM; Merikangas, KR

Published Date

  • April 2012

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 69 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 381 - 389

PubMed ID

  • 22474106

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22474106

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1538-3636

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0003-990X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.1603

Language

  • eng