Improved outcome in central nervous system aspergillosis, using voriconazole treatment.

Published

Journal Article

The mortality of central nervous system (CNS) aspergillosis approaches 100%, requiring improved therapies. Voriconazole gives superior efficacy and survival in invasive aspergillosis, compared with amphotericin B. Also, in contrast to other antifungal drugs, voriconazole penetrates well into the CNS. We evaluated, retrospectively, the outcome and survival of 81 patients who were treated with voriconazole for definite (n = 48) or probable (n = 33) CNS aspergillosis. Complete and partial responses were recorded in 35% of patients and varied by the underlying disease group: hematologic malignancies (54%), other underlying conditions (50%), chronic immunosuppression (45%), solid organ transplantation (36%), and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (16%). Thirty-one percent of patients survived CNS aspergillosis for a median observation time of 390 days. There were 31 patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures, including craniotomy/abscess resection (n = 14), abscess drainage (n = 12), ventricular shunt (n = 4), and Ommaya-reservoir (n = 1). Multifactorial analysis revealed that neurosurgery was associated with improved survival (P = .02). Patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had a poorer survival (P = .02), but 7 (22%) of 32 survived for a median of 203 days. We conclude from this large cohort of patients that voriconazole treatment together with neurosurgical management, whenever feasible, is currently the best approach to treat patients with CNS aspergillosis.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Schwartz, S; Ruhnke, M; Ribaud, P; Corey, L; Driscoll, T; Cornely, OA; Schuler, U; Lutsar, I; Troke, P; Thiel, E

Published Date

  • October 2005

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 106 / 8

Start / End Page

  • 2641 - 2645

PubMed ID

  • 15998833

Pubmed Central ID

  • 15998833

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1528-0020

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0006-4971

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1182/blood-2005-02-0733

Language

  • eng