Depression after successful treatment for nonsmall cell lung carcinoma.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: There have been few studies of depression in nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients after successful treatment. The purpose of the study was to clarify the prevalence and the correlated factors of depression after surgery. METHODS: A structured interview was conducted for patient characteristics and social support with NSCLC patients at baseline. One-month prevalence of depression at 1 and 3 months after surgery was obtained by follow-up interviews at 1 and 3 months after surgery, respectively, whereas that of depression at 2 months after surgery was by the latter interview retrospectively. Three-month prevalence of depression was determined as presence of depression during any month in of a period of 3 months after surgery. A logistic analysis was used to examine the correlated factors of depression during the 3 months after surgery. RESULTS: Of 223 consecutive cancer patients who participated in the study between June 1996 and April 1999, 33 (14.8%) met the criteria for major or minor depression during the 3 months after surgery. One-month prevalence of depression at 1, 2, and 3 months after surgery were 9.0%, 9.4%, and 5.8%, respectively. The results of logistic regression analysis revealed that only satisfaction with confidants before surgery, of patient characteristics and social support factors, was significantly associated with depression during the 3 months after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that depression is not rare after successful treatment for NSCLC and that social support may play an important role for NSCLC patients with depression after successful treatment.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Uchitomi, Y; Mikami, I; Kugaya, A; Akizuki, N; Nagai, K; Nishiwaki, Y; Akechi, T; Okamura, H

Published Date

  • September 1, 2000

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 89 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 1172 - 1179

PubMed ID

  • 10964348

Pubmed Central ID

  • 10964348

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0008-543X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/1097-0142(20000901)89:5<1172::aid-cncr27>3.0.co;2-u

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States