When consumers do not recognize "benign" intention questions as persuasion attempts

Published

Journal Article

We demonstrate that the mere-measurement effect occurs because asking an intention question is not perceived as a persuasion attempt. In experiments 1 and 2, we show that when persuasive intent is attributed to an intention question, consumers adjust their behavior as long as they have sufficient cognitive capacity to permit conscious correction. In experiment 3 we demonstrate that this finding holds with product choice and consumption, and we find that persuasion knowledge mediates the effects. In experiment 4, we show that when respondents are educated that an intention question is a persuasive attempt, the behavioral impact of those questions is attenuated.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Williams, P; Fitzsimons, GJ; Block, LG

Published Date

  • December 1, 2004

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 31 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 540 - 550

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0093-5301

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1086/425088

Citation Source

  • Scopus