Differential levels of stress in caregivers of brain tumor patients--observations from a pilot study.

Journal Article

OBJECTIVE: Caregivers of patients with brain tumors (BT) experience elevated levels of stress. Using pilot data, we sought to determine which caregivers are at risk for experiencing elevated levels of stress based on caregiver-demographic and patient-medical information. METHODS: Using a convenience sample of 60 caregivers, participants were asked to complete the Perceived Stress Scale and to provide demographic information. The Perceived Stress Scale is a 10-item scale designed to measure the degree to which situations in life are perceived as stressful. Demographic information was collected using self-reported measures. Medical data concerning tumor grade of patient were obtained from most recent medical note. Data for study were standardized using z-scores and analyzed using SPSS software. RESULTS: Seventy-two percent (n=43) of caregivers reported experiencing elevated levels of stress within the last 30 days. Thirty-five percent (n=21) of the sample scored at least one standard deviation above the mean. A statistical trend [F(1, 57)=3.12, p=0.08] exists between caregiver stress and tumor grade of patients for which they are providing care. CONCLUSIONS: Caregivers of patients with BT experience significant stress. Furthermore, this data provide an indication of the profound levels of stress these caregivers experience. Caregivers of patients with grade I/II tumors are at increased risk for experiencing stress. Younger caregiver age and higher levels of education were also found to correlate to higher levels of stress.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Keir, ST; Guill, AB; Carter, KE; Boole, LC; Gonzales, L; Friedman, HS

Published Date

  • December 2006

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 14 / 12

Start / End Page

  • 1258 - 1261

PubMed ID

  • 16775683

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1433-7339

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0941-4355

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/s00520-006-0090-1

Language

  • eng