Correlation of angiographic findings and right (V1 to V3) versus left (V4 to V6) precordial ST-segment depression in inferior wall acute myocardial infarction.

Published

Journal Article

This study assessed whether differences in the underlying mechanisms for various patterns of precordial ST-segment depression with inferior acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are associated with poorer prognoses. We studied 1,155 patients with inferior AMI who underwent thrombolysis in the Global Utilization of Streptokinase and TPA for Occluded arteries (GUSTO-I) angiographic substudy: those without precordial ST depression (n = 412; 35.7%), those with maximum ST depression in leads V1 to V3 (n = 547; 47.4%), and those with maximum ST depression in leads V4 to V6 (n = 196; 17.0%) on admission electrocardiogram. We compared the infarct-related artery, presence of left anterior descending or multivessel coronary artery disease, and left ventricular function among groups. Patients with maximum ST depression in leads V4 to V6 more often had 3-vessel disease (26.0%) than those without precordial ST depression (13.5%) or those with ST depression in leads V1 to V3 (15.7%; p = 0.002), and they had a lower ejection fraction (median 54% vs 60% and 55%, respectively; p <0.001). Patients with maximum ST depression in leads V1 to V3 less often had AMIs due to proximal right coronary artery obstruction (23.9%) than patients without precordial ST depression (35.2%) or those with ST depression in leads V4 to V6 (40.0%; p = 0.001) and had larger AMIs as estimated by peak creatine kinase. Different patterns of precordial ST depression are associated with distinctive coronary anatomy. ST depression in leads V4 to V6, but not V1 to V3, confers a greater likelihood of multivessel coronary artery disease.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Birnbaum, Y; Wagner, GS; Barbash, GI; Gates, K; Criger, DA; Sclarovsky, S; Siegel, RJ; Granger, CB; Reiner, JS; Ross, AM

Published Date

  • January 15, 1999

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 83 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 143 - 148

PubMed ID

  • 10073811

Pubmed Central ID

  • 10073811

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0002-9149

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/s0002-9149(98)00814-5

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States