Antibody to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (CD54) decreases survival and not lung injury in baboons with sepsis

Published

Journal Article

Neutrophil influx into the lung is an important event in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in gram-negative sepsis. We hypothesized that administration of a monoclonal antibody to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, CD54), a molecule mediating neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells, would decrease neutrophil sequestration and transmigration in the lung and attenuate lung injury in Escherichia coli sepsis. Sepsis was induced in 12 baboons primed with heat-killed E. coli (1 × 109 CFU/kg) 12 h before infusion of live bacteria (1 × 1010 CFU/kg). Six animals received monoclonal antibody to CD54 (1 mg/kg) intravenously at the time of live E. coli infusion. After 48 h or when blood pressure could not be maintained, tissues were harvested and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples were obtained. Median survival time was decreased in anti-CD54-treated animals. This group also had decreased mean arterial pressure, increased metabolic acidosis, and decreased urine output. Measures of lung injury including gas exchange, lung lavage protein and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lung thiobarbituric acid-reactive species, and lung histology, including alveolar neutrophil volumes, were unaffected by treatment. The effect of anti-CD54 on neutrophil influx into tissues as measured by myeloperoxidase was organ specific. These data show that monoclonal antibody to CD54 does not ameliorate acute lung injury in E. coli sepsis, and septic primates given anti-CD54 have worsened metabolic parameters and decreased survival.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Welty-Wolf, KE; Carraway, MS; Huang, YCT; Simonson, SG; Kantrow, SP; Kishimoto, TK; Piantadosi, CA

Published Date

  • January 1, 2001

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 163 / 3 I

Start / End Page

  • 665 - 673

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1073-449X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1164/ajrccm.163.3.2004191

Citation Source

  • Scopus