Adjunctive counseling during brief and extended buprenorphine-naloxone treatment for prescription opioid dependence: a 2-phase randomized controlled trial.

Published

Journal Article

CONTEXT: No randomized trials have examined treatments for prescription opioid dependence, despite its increasing prevalence. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of brief and extended buprenorphine hydrochloride-naloxone hydrochloride treatment, with different counseling intensities, for patients dependent on prescription opioids. DESIGN: Multisite, randomized clinical trial using a 2-phase adaptive treatment research design. Brief treatment (phase 1) included 2-week buprenorphine-naloxone stabilization, 2-week taper, and 8-week postmedication follow-up. Patients with successful opioid use outcomes exited the study; unsuccessful patients entered phase 2: extended (12-week) buprenorphine-naloxone treatment, 4-week taper, and 8-week postmedication follow-up. SETTING: Ten US sites. Patients A total of 653 treatment-seeking outpatients dependent on prescription opioids. INTERVENTIONS: In both phases, patients were randomized to standard medical management (SMM) or SMM plus opioid dependence counseling; all received buprenorphine-naloxone. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Predefined "successful outcome" in each phase: composite measures indicating minimal or no opioid use based on urine test-confirmed self-reports. RESULTS: During phase 1, only 6.6% (43 of 653) of patients had successful outcomes, with no difference between SMM and SMM plus opioid dependence counseling. In contrast, 49.2% (177 of 360) attained successful outcomes in phase 2 during extended buprenorphine-naloxone treatment (week 12), with no difference between counseling conditions. Success rates 8 weeks after completing the buprenorphine-naloxone taper (phase 2, week 24) dropped to 8.6% (31 of 360), again with no counseling difference. In secondary analyses, successful phase 2 outcomes were more common while taking buprenorphine-naloxone than 8 weeks after taper (49.2% [177 of 360] vs 8.6% [31 of 360], P < .001). Chronic pain did not affect opioid use outcomes; a history of ever using heroin was associated with lower phase 2 success rates while taking buprenorphine-naloxone. CONCLUSIONS: Prescription opioid-dependent patients are most likely to reduce opioid use during buprenorphine-naloxone treatment; if tapered off buprenorphine-naloxone, even after 12 weeks of treatment, the likelihood of an unsuccessful outcome is high, even in patients receiving counseling in addition to SMM.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Weiss, RD; Potter, JS; Fiellin, DA; Byrne, M; Connery, HS; Dickinson, W; Gardin, J; Griffin, ML; Gourevitch, MN; Haller, DL; Hasson, AL; Huang, Z; Jacobs, P; Kosinski, AS; Lindblad, R; McCance-Katz, EF; Provost, SE; Selzer, J; Somoza, EC; Sonne, SC; Ling, W

Published Date

  • December 2011

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 68 / 12

Start / End Page

  • 1238 - 1246

PubMed ID

  • 22065255

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22065255

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1538-3636

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.121

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States