Tiagabine increases slow-wave sleep in a dose-dependent fashion without affecting traditional efficacy measures in adults with primary insomnia.

Published

Journal Article

INTRODUCTION: This study evaluated dose-response effects of tiagabine on sleep in adults with primary insomnia. METHODS: Men and women with primary insomnia (DSM-IV-TR) were randomly assigned to receive tiagabine 4, 6, 8, 10 mg or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study. Efficacy was assessed using polysomnography and self-report measures. Safety analyses included measures of residual sedation and adverse events. RESULTS: A total of 232 patients (31% men; mean age 44.3 years) received study drug. No significant differences were observed between tiagabine and placebo in wake after sleep onset, latency to persistent sleep, or total sleep time. Significantly greater increases from baseline in slow-wave sleep (stages 3 and 4) were found with the 3 highest doses of tiagabine compared with placebo (p < .01). Stage 1 sleep showed a significantly greater decrease from baseline for all doses of tiagabine than for placebo (p < .01). Self-report measures of sleep and daytime function did not differ from placebo, except for poorer ratings on the 10-mg dose. Similarly, psychomotor performance on the 10-mg dose was worsened compared with placebo. Tiagabine was generally well tolerated; dizziness and nausea were the most common adverse events, particularly at the 2 higher doses. CONCLUSIONS: In adults with primary insomnia, tiagabine significantly increased slow-wave sleep in a dose-dependent manner with a corresponding significant decrease in Stage 1 sleep, whereas no significant differences were observed in wake after sleep onset, latency to persistent sleep, or total sleep time compared with placebo.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Walsh, JK; Perlis, M; Rosenthal, M; Krystal, A; Jiang, J; Roth, T

Published Date

  • January 15, 2006

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 2 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 35 - 41

PubMed ID

  • 17557435

Pubmed Central ID

  • 17557435

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1550-9389

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States